Aq: Acquisition Reports in Google Analytics

Acquisition reports in Google Analytics

Today, we talk about acquisition reports in Google Analytics.

Aq: Acquisition Reports in Google Analytics

ACQUISITION: The acquisition reports are what drew me to Google Analytics, and as we go through these Acquisition elements, you’ll see there is good reason why. These reports are insightful and empowering for any marketer who is tasked with driving traffic to your website.

The first question that the reports answer: how did our website visitors find us?

We will learn about search traffic, referrals and direct visitors. If you have ever wondered what the terms in a traffic report means, then stay tuned. We also help you understand how you can make these reports much more useful using campaign tracking.

Acquisition reports in Google Analytics

ACQUISITION REPORTS: “The where?” – learn how people are finding your site.

The acquisition reports in Google Analytics is a “broader” element which gives us an overview of this section of Google Analytics. The subsequent elements under the category “Acquisition” are “narrower” elements exploring higher level of details within the section.

In the acquisition reports, data can tell us who are the visitors to our website. And more importantly, how did they get there.

Data from this reports will show if the visitors are coming from a direct URL link, social media, email marketing efforts, search engines, or other sources.

These different traffic sources are aggregated into channels. We’ll look at channels more closely in a later video.

Acquisition reports also reports your ads performance if you’re using Google Adwords. SEO and social media reports can also be found in the acquisition reports.

Acquisition reports in Google Analytics

Beginner to advanced. Many will find the acquisition reports in Google Analytics helpful even after many years of using it. The knowledge to be gain is valuable for everyone.

Acquisition reports in Google Analytics

  1. Drill down into each channel groupings. The reporting at the channel level is not detailed enough to give your useful information. You’ll need to explore further down to see each specific traffic source.
  2. Check the default settings on channel groupings. The default channel grouping may be misleading as the information may not be what is useful for you, or very accurate.
  3. Block out referral spam. Or make sure the referral traffic sources are legitimate. Ensure that these referrals are traffic you would like to track.

 

Want to know more about the Periodic Table of Google Analytics? Visit here for more information.